Supporting AlmaLinux

We are pleased to be supporting the AlmaLinux OS Foundation as it starts its work as steward of the community around the new AlmaLinux distribution. Meshed’s founder Simon Phipps is joining the newly-incorporated non-profit as a director. In this role he will be building on his experience with many other open source Foundations to ensure that the governance is fair, stable, independent and transparent while also serving the needs of the AlmaLinux user community.

With the unexpected switch of CentOS to become an experimental upstream of RHEL, it was inevitable that candidates would emerge to replace it in its role of an unaffiliated downstream binary-compatible distribution of RHEL. The existence of a reliable downstream distribution is good for everyone, offering a low-friction on-ramp for newcomers and a long-term home for those capable of self-support. It builds the market so that commercial players also benefit from the ever-growing user base in a classic adoption-led model.

So it’s good that the need is being met by a distro anchored in an independent Foundation. AlmaLinux aims to leverage the existing build processes of a contributor company, CloudLinux, to produce a reliable, stable, binary-compatible distribution within the context of a community-administered non-profit Foundation. This US 501(c)(6) will hold all the trademarks, keys and other assets of AlmaLinux on behalf of the community. We’re pleased to be able to help make the initiative succeed. Congratulations on the first release!

The theme this week at Meshed was standards and open source. A recent post explained how open source and open standards are essentially unrelated, almost contrasting concepts joined philosophically by some based on their application in some industries. Two posts this took look at the consequences of that reality. To summarise the contrast in this context:

Continue reading

The Week In Review: Standards

One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

Please donate to keep us afloat!
We’re not in anyone’s pocket so we rely on reader patronage.

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

£3.00
£9.00
£60.00
£3.00
£9.00
£60.00
£3.00
£9.00
£60.00

Or enter a custom amount

£

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly

Thank you for supporting Meshed!

The results are in, and effective April 1st (yes!) Simon has been elected back to the OSI Board by the Affiliates after a year off due to term limits. His platform statement is here.

OSI Election

Why Are Our Articles Free?

We don’t paywall the articles we post here, we don’t pack advertising around them and we share them freely with OpenSource.com and others. Why do we do that? It’s because of support from our readers via Patreon.

Small investments make big returns

Patreon Patrons pledge to pay a small amount — as little as $1 — every time we publish a new article here. They keep control of how much they pay and how often, but their support means we can simply write and publish freely — without editorial interference or pandering to advertising keywords.

We want to keep things this way. Please become a Patreon Patron! Visit Simon’s profile or just go straight to the sign-up page!

Bitcoin Donations

Observant readers will have spotted the new “Donate Bitcoins” button on the Meshed website (over there on the right).  If you would like to encourage us in our activities, we would be grateful for a few satoshii thrown our way.

The donation mechanism uses Coinbase. We picked this rather than,  say, Paypal because it allows anyone anywhere in the world to easily make a donation in relative anonymity. You can use bitcoin in your own Bitcoin wallet, or you can pay Coinbase in your local currency. Do give it a try so you can tell your friends you have used Bitcoin!

Setting Up Our Voice-Over-IP Phone System

As I mentioned recently on Google+, I’ve recently installed a telephone system for Meshed Insights using a Raspberry Pi. Here’s a description of the system I’ve put together.

Raspberry PI PBX

The brains live in a model B Raspberry Pi. I installed the GNU/Linux distribution Raspbian using the easy NOOBS on an SD card, then installed RasPBX — FreePBX and Asterisk — using the Pi Store via the desktop as that was easiest. I enabled sshd so I can log in from the office (using a private key so it’s less hackable), set the unit to have a fixed IP on our internal network and then disconnected the keyboard, mouse and screen. The system now runs headless in our server room. Continue reading